Koox Seen 

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Koox or Koox Seen (variations : Kooh Seen[2][3] or Kiim Koox[4]) is a deity in Seereer religion.[4] Koox is synonymous to the deity Roog Seen (or Roog),[3][4] and it is the name used by some Cangin speakers such as the Saafi and Noon to refer to the supreme and creator deity.[4] 


Name


The name Koox, pronounced and sometimes spelled Kooh, comes from the Cangin language, Saafen in particular.[1] Among the Saafi people, Koox means the "atmospheric supreme God" or "God of rain and the heavens".[4][5] Koox is the supreme and creator deity.[3] The Seex people refer to the creator deity as Roog, whilst the Saafi refer to it as Koox.[3][7] 


Worship


In Serer religion, Koox is associated with the heavens, especially rain.[1] Bandia, a Saafi village in Senegal plays a key role in reciting prayers to Koox especially during drought.[4] The Seereer high priests and priestesses (Saltigue) are usually reserved for such events.[6] 


References


[1] Diouf & Leichtman, p 96 

[2] "Notes africaines, Issues 181–190", Institut Fondamental d'Afrique Noire, Institut français d'Afrique noire, Institut français d'Afrique noire, (1984), pp 45–6 

[3] Dupire, Marguerite, "Sagesse sereer: Essais sur la pensée sereer ndut", KARTHALA Editions (1994), p 54, ISBN 2865374874 

[4] Diouf, Mamadou; Leichtman, Mara. "New perspectives on Islam in Senegal: conversion, migration, wealth, power, and femininity", Palgrave Macmillan (2009), pp 93–95, 104–6, ISBN 0230606482 

[5] It can mean : "God of the Heavens" but more so "God of Rain" or "Rain God". See : Diouf & Leichtman, p 96 

[6] Galvan, Dennis Charles, "The State Must Be Our Master of Fire: How Peasants Craft Culturally Sustainable Development in Senegal." Berkeley, University of California Press ( 2004). pp 86–135, 202–204 

[7] Thiaw, Issaw Laye,"La religiosité des Seereer, avant et pendant leur islamisation"


Bibliography 


  1. Diouf, Mamadou; Leichtman, Mara, "New perspectives on Islam in Senegal: conversion, migration, wealth, power, and femininity", Palgrave Macmillan (2009), pp 93–96, 104–6, ISBN 9780230618503
  2. "Notes africaines, Issues 181–190", Institut Fondamental d'Afrique Noire, Institut français d'Afrique noire, Institut français d'Afrique noire, (1984), pp 45–6
  3. Galvan, Dennis Charles, "The State Must Be Our Master of Fire: How Peasants Craft Culturally Sustainable Development in Senegal." Berkeley, University of California Press (2004). pp 86–135, 202–204 
  4. Ndiaye, Ousmane Sémou, "Diversité et unicité sérères : l’exemple de la région de Thiès", [in] Éthiopiques, no 54, vol. 7, 2e semestre 1991].  Available online (Last retrieved : 13 July 2013) 
  5. Dupire, Marguerite, "Sagesse sereer: Essais sur la pensée sereer ndut", KARTHALA Editions (1994), p 54, ISBN 2865374874Available online in (Last retrieved : 13 July 2013). Also available in Persée : Portail de revues en sciences humaines et sociales (scientific journals)Last retrieved : 13 July 2013.
  6. Thiaw, Issa Laye, "La religiosité des Seereer, avant et pendant leur islamisation'' [in] Éthiopiques, n°54 revue semestrielle de culture négro-africaine, Nouvelle série, volume 7, 2e semestre (1991)

English

This article is part of the Seereer religion series. For other religious related articles, click on the category button below:

Please cite this work as:


The Seereer Resource Centre, "Koox Seen : Seereer Deity" (2013), [in] The Seereer Resource Centre, URL: https://www.seereer.com/koox-seen